Public Policy

Child Care and Development Fund Plan for Georgia FFY 2016-2018

As the voice for Atlanta’s women and children, on January 30, 2016, AWF provided comment on the proposed Child Care and Development Fund Plan for Georgia FFY 2016-2018. To read AWF’s comments, click here.

 

The Alexander-Taylor Women Overcoming Barriers Advocacy Program

Advocacy is one of the most effective ways to combat the sort of interrelated root causes of social problems and systemic factors that are detailed in the AWF’s Breaking the Cycle of Generational Poverty in Metro Atlanta research findings.

In 2013, AWF formed a Public Policy & Community Education Committee that was charged with fostering legislative and public action that will support the elimination of generational poverty among women and girls. Through a thorough review of current policy and based on AWF’s community assessment survey results, AWF’s Breaking the Cycle of Generational Poverty Research and Georgia Budget & Policy Institute’s Recovery or Bust Policy: Georgia’s Poor Left Behind report, AWF’s Public Policy & Community Education Committee selected child care as the primary public policy issue for AWF.

Facts:

  • Single moms need child care to work, attend school, and improve their lives
  • The average cost of infant care in Fulton County is $9,149
  • 56% of GA’s 0-5 population is low income
  • Approximately 13% of total low income population receives child care subsidy
  • 19,209 of 55,000 children receiving subsidies are in Quality Rated programs (Feb data)
  • Currently Georgia is ranked 47/50 for quality of care.

AWF Policy Action Steps:

Research Advocacy – Gathering of data or information to inform
Create economic case to support an increase in child care subsidies for families in need, which will illustrate the long-term benefit to the state of Georgia. To read AWF’s report on the economic case for child care subsidies in Georgia, click here.

Educational Advocacy – To inform and educate
Support efforts to provide Quality Rated trainings for all 8,000 child care providers before 2017.

Increase the number of intermediate and advanced trainings, which will increase ratings and allow for additional funding/subsidies for childcare providers.

Legislative Advocacy – To impact public policy
Increase the number of child care subsidies for families (primarily single-female head of households) in the State of Georgia, which will impact the families in AWF’s 5-county service area.